Frequently Asked Questions

  • ​What is SO2GO?
    SO2GO is a food additive developed by a winemaker.  It reduces and oxidizes “free sulfur dioxide” (SO2) levels, also known as sulfites in wine or Champagne. SO2Go works by saturating the wine with oxygen shortly before consumption. This burst of oxygen binds to the sulfites, effectively reducing them.
  • Will SO2GO affect the quality or taste of my wine?
    No. There is no impact on the quality or taste of your wine or Champagne – it will just have less sulfite preservatives.
  • What is in SO2GO?
    SO2GO contains a measured, dilute level of food grade hydrogen peroxide. Ingredients found in SO2GO are used by winemakers around the world to reduce sulfite preservatives. The U.S. FDA affirms the diluted ingredient used in SO2GO as (GRAS) generally recognized as safe, for oxidizing and reducing sulfites in wine.
  • Does SO2GO eliminate all sulfites?
    No. SO2GO works on free (versus bound sulfur dioxide) sulfur dioxide (SO2). Tests by Winery Laboratory services of Australia demonstrate that SO2GO reduces approximately 50-80% of free sulfur dioxide in various wines. The percentage is dependent on numerous factors including:
    1. age and variety of wine,
    2. sealant (cork or cap) and
    3. winery specifications.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How do I use SO2GO?
    By the bottle or by the glass, simply add to the wine or Champagne just prior to drinking. By the glass: pump two sprays from SO2GO spray bottle into glass with wine. Swirl and enjoy! By the bottle: add packet to 750ml bottle, re-cork or re-screw cap, invert bottle then serve.
  • Will SO2GO be effective in all wines?
    SO2GO will work on red, white and dessert wines.  Usually best on younger wines (1-3yrs.) Wines with screw cap seal which make a very effective seal where little oxygen makes its way into a bottle are also types for using SO2GO. Aged wines are less likely to need SO2GO as the levels of Sulfur in these wines will drop over time.
  • Who should use SO2GO?
    There are several different groups that may benefit from reducing sulfite preservatives in wine and Champagne: sulfite allergic, sulfite sensitive, and those in the population who want to reduce preservatives in their food intake.

    Many people, however, have little tolerance for sulfites. They are considered sulfite-sensitive. Even for moderate wine drinkers, the average level of sulfites found in many commercial wines can cause heartburns or other side effects. The total number of people who suffer with sulfite sensitivity is unknown and many are not aware that mild, unpleasant reactions such as nasal congestion, headaches, coughing, burning sensations, hives, cramps, or flushing of the skin may be caused by sulfites.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What are Sulfites?
    Sulfites, or sulfiting agents, are sulfur-based substances used primarily as preservatives. Six are used by the food industry: sulfur dioxide, sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfite, potassium bisulfite, sodium metabisulfite and potassium metabisulfite.

    Sulfites also are used to bleach food starches, to condition dough for some baked goods, to control fermentation of wine and to soften corn kernels during the wet-milling process.
  • How are Sulfites Used?
    They are used primarily to reduce or prevent spoilage and discoloration during the preparation, storage and distribution of foods. The products so treated include processed potatoes, many dried fruits, dehydrated vegetables and some seafood, especially shellfish. Sulfites retard browning and inhibit the deterioration of such nutrients as vitamin C.
  • Why are Sulfites used in wine making?
    Sulfur has been used as a preservative in winemaking for hundreds of years. To prevent wine spoilage, European winemakers pioneered the use of sulfur dioxide (SO2) two hundred years ago. Unfortunately, freshly pressed grape juice has a tendency to spoil due to contamination from bacteria and wild yeasts present on the grape skins. Not only does sulfur dioxide inhibit the growth of molds and bacteria, but it also stops oxidation (browning) and preserves the wine's natural flavor. Without sulfur, grape juice would turn to vinegar. Even if sulfites are not added to wine, there will always be a small amount of sulfites present because it is naturally occurring in the environment and in grapes.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Are Sulfites found in other products?
    According to Mitchell Zeller of the Washington, D.C. based Center for Science in the Public Interest, sulfites exist in a wide variety of products at levels that are comparable to, or in excess of the concentration that is found in wine. The presence of sulfites ranging from 6 to 6000 ppm is found in products such as fruit juices, dried fruits, fruit concentrates, syrups, sugar, jams, gelatins, cake toppings, baked goods, pizza dough, frozen and dehydrated potatoes, processed vegetables, cheeses, as well as in many prescription drugs.
  • Will SO2GO prevent hangovers?
    SO2GO does not prevent "hangovers” from over-indulgence of alcohol.
  • What regulations exist regarding the use of Sulfites in wine?
    A federal law in 1987 says that any wine bottled from this point on, must have a label affixed with a declaration of sulfites if above 10 parts per million. The label may be front, back, strip, or neck, but it must be affixed to every bottle. Wine with sulfite levels above 10 parts per million with a maximum of 350 parts per million must be labeled with the declaration that it “contains sulfites.”
  • Where can I purchase SO2GO?
    SO2GO can be found in good wine stores but you can also stock up on SO2GO by visiting our online store.
  • Where is SO2GO produced?
    SO2GO is a product of Australia and was first developed by a winemaker